Hard Work At Home Still Yields Dividends

“Out Behind The Barn.”

That’s the title of a country tune by one of our favorite country singers. With humorous yet truthful lyrics backed by fast-beat guitar and a jovial original presentation from the shortest, longest-enduring, still-entertaining singer, Little Jimmy Dickens, it still carries many of life’s lessons and lifts one’s spirit a half   century after first being recorded.

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Words Can Still Have More Power Than Pictures

“A picture is worth a thousand words.”

We’ve made that statement many times and have often tried to accompany our writings with pictures, although formats sometimes prohibit it. Everybody always looks at pictures, whether they ever read a word of a story. Of course, horse  photographs are our favorite, and we can spend hours looking at horse and rodeo   pictures.

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Power Of Water Frequently Overlooked

Nothing on earth is more important than water.

It is truly the most essential element of mankind. Everything we can think of depends on water in one form or another for survival. Yet, water is one of the most discussed, cussed, debated and frequently under appreciated, even criticized, nutrients, commodities, compounds, chemicals (yes, it is all of those) ever known to man.

Seldom have we ever complained about water, as our livelihood depends on it in every shape and form. By the same token, the most-appreciated showers on Fourth of July probably brought more complaints than many other rains throughout the years. It truly did rain on the parades, and the loudest complainers were from the fireworks stands.

What could be better than a rain on July 4? More common to the date is hot, dry conditions, even drought. When grass is springtime green while corn is tasseling, certainly agriculture is under a considerate watchful eye. Definition of water is kind of hard, yet quite simple.

Truly, water is a “transparent, odorless, tasteless liquid. “ How can something with absolutely nothing, no characteristics, be so valuable? Still, it obviously is. Even though we were a very poor chemistry student, our simple brain understands that it really is a chemical formula combining hydrogen and oxygen: H2O.

An old saying that “man can not live on just bread and water alone” is not true, at least not physically. Life does take more than water, but not much. Any living creature can survive for extended periods on water as the entire nutrient source. Yet without water, all things will wither and eventually die.

Not only is water essential to livelihood, but it is medicinal within itself. The human digestive system requires water for cleansing all other things one consumes. Often, the healing and soothing properties of water are overlooked,

Nutritionists recommend that one drink seven glasses of water daily, to replace water lost through respiration, dehydration and evaporation, but to also clean the body functions. Likewise, when one is injured, hydration with water is the best soothing and healing agent, often overlooked, but the most healthy and economical.

Power of water is apparent when downpours bring flooding destruction of crops, land and property, even deaths of humans and livestock. Just as obvious is the power of no rain and famine across the land.  All land was once flooded, but water receded. All land has experienced drought, but eventually it has always rained. There is a water director.

He is our Savior, and water is referred to no less than 722 times in the Bible to stress the great spiritual significance of it. First mention is in Genesis 1:20: “Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life.” Again in John 3:5: “Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.”

Final reference comes in Revelation 22:17: “And the Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And let him that is athirst come. And whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely.”

+++ALLELUIA+++

Starving Mustangs Add to Debate As Owner Is Imprisoned

The Bureau of Land Management’s wild mustang management  program, which has drawn considerable discussion for years, has been again brought under fire in a Nebraska animal cruelty case.

Restore Our American Mustangs Act (ROAM), federal legislation to overhaul the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, was approved by the U.S. House of Representatives last summer. Similar  legislation has stalled in the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, where it was referred last August.

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