Mediocrity Never Wins The Race

Sometimes, one has to step across the line.

Although a perfect person may claim to have never stretched the rules, it is highly doubtful.  Certainly, if that is true, the individual has been mediocre or below in   achievement. Always toeing the line is generally the way to keep out of trouble, get along, never raise an eyebrow, or in no way ruffle a feather.


There are folks we know who would probably fit into that realm in some aspects, but very few in reality. They’ve most likely gone 26 in a 25-mile-an-hour zone, duplicated
their child’s first grade drawing on the company machine without paying reimbursement or even signed a receipt and walked off with a store pen never giving it a second thought.

These might be simple exaggerations of breaking the rules, wrongdoing, stealing, whatever technical criteria one might desire to lump them into. Almost without   exception, the guilty would shrug the action off as unimportant, proclaiming, “It doesn’t matter. It’s such a little thing. Nobody will ever know.” It does matter, and they do know.

Bending the norm, going ahead of, over, under, around, perhaps through the majority is what has made our country great. It is the exertion that has developed horseback riders into champion cowboys. Small shop owners have become acclaimed entrepreneurs and billionaires. Thus a step beyond is essential for triumph.

Those who excel have often offended others along the route, whether it is intentional or not. Example we are referring to at this time is a teacher, whose students excel because of his dedication to them.

This includes coming to class early, staying hours into the night, weekends and holidays on the job, missed meals, extra sessions with parents, going to bat for a student in another class, visiting one in infirmity, caring about personal disgruntlements and in general spending personal time on the job in students’
behalf.

Sometimes, fellow faculty, even administrators, community decision-makers and parents of those who are not reaping the extra benefits can become accusative and defensive because another is doing his job so very well, that it makes those of mediocrity look bad, or they get that personal feeling of guilt.

Lots of variables come into situations when one surpasses another in any endeavor. One might be late to class, turn in an assignment after it is due, never do a report, miss a day of school,  neglect another scheduled practice, or God forbid, come into class with hog manure on the boots. While not condoned, they are things that do
happen.

“Rules are made to be broken” has complete truth to it. Only the Ten Commandments are God-given, and all forms of others come from man, and can be and are readily changed. Crossing the line in the name of those who count most, our young people, the citizens of today and progenitors of future generations, is most commendable.

It is like Isaiah 55:8: “I don’t think the way you think. The way you work isn’t the way I work.” Most importantly is Deuteronomy 28:1: “If you listen to God, and obey his commandments, all blessings will come down on you.”  Best conclusion is in Genesis 31:52: “I won’t cross this line to hurt you, and you won’t cross this line to hurt me.”

+++ALLELUIA+++