Help Filling The Tank

“Low Fuel,” a buzzer has gone off and the “idiot light” has shown bright twice in the past two weeks.

An initial irritation, but well worth it considering consequences when running out of gas.

However after that deserved warning there’s no inkling how miles before it goes completely dry. In decades gone by there wasn’t any clue of such either than possibly bad unforgettable experiences.

Previously only a gauge moved from full to quarter to half to bottom-quarter to red meaning empty.

Few haven’t kept the pedal going despite being made aware fuel was supposedly all gone. It sometimes seemed to create an inner dare to see just how many miles were left in the tank.

Those tempters have generally been caught and run out at least once. They’ll not speculate the trickle of gasoline remaining again or at least for an extended time.

Nowadays drivers are spoiled comparatively as there’s a gadget revealing “fuel range” before a completely vacant tank.

Every vehicle’s a little different and lots of things can come into play until an engine dies from no fuel.

Actually some buzzer warnings go off when the indicator has just shown “50 miles.” But there’s still a gut uncertainty uneasiness to get to the gas pump as quickly as possible.

Half-full means half-empty to many smart drivers and if the gauge gets near just-a-quarter, fill up is in order. Others wait until it’s below that line sneaking into the red before finding a pump. Those who just keep going are often sorry.

Slow learners have run out too often, like speeders getting citations, they just don’t get it, never learn.

Complications can be extensive when empty in the middle of nowhere. It’s a long walk home on a wide open country road with no travelers especially in the days before cellphones.

Of many such semblances two are most memorable. One was traveling in Iowa to judge a horseshow; fortunately a congenial farmer had a tank to help out.

Another was nighttime two miles from home and passenger well along with unborn first child. Walked to ranch, filled gallon gasoline jug, rode ugly white mare Candy back, and eventually all was just fine.

There’s always been an upper power looking down helping out.

Reminded of Matthew 20:23: “My Father is taking care of that.”

+++ALLELUIA+++

XIII–40–9-29-19