Rain Has Always Come

“It’s sure hard to grow anything in the dust.”

The one getting his haircut in the barber’s chair made that evaluation as the waiting room conversation continued about weather.

Nodding heads and grunts were in consensus as latest heard forecasts were shared with personal opinions aired as well.

Certainly there’s dire need for ample rainfall in some locales where even those promised showers have passed by.

Still drought maps indicate much of the Midwest is shy on moisture with downpours in every county a necessary solution.

Such dry conditions and record wind gusts brought fire danger warnings which have sadly come to reality.

There have been a number of local pasture fires consuming large acreages plus some facility loss. Truly heartwarming how friends, neighbors and firefighting crews will come together seemingly instantly and diligently work as a team. Of all the dangerous jobs, battling blazes in very dry conditions with unrelenting record speed winds is the most hazardous.

Additional issue is probability of a controlled fire restarting after firefighters have left the scene. On several occasions fires have been considered out and hours later come calls they’re furiously aflame again.

Weathermen have been partially accurate with forecasts for widespread relief of moisture distress. Still early on there’s been great inconsistency with one farm receiving nice rainfall and neighboring counties getting zilch.

Before rains began already negativists were complaining how mud would increase work difficulties. Exclamations expanded when there were just a few scattered showers around.

True moisture brought mud first increasing difficulty traveling country roads. Worse is feeding hay in native pastures with mechanical equipment leaving scars to never completely heal.

Added to issues is how much feed that can be wasted during wet weather conditions. Spring is around the corner and cows are not very easily satisfied as when it’s subzero. Despite being given quality feedstuffs they’ll often just tromp hay into the ground begging for something different.

Farmers are never satisfied whatever the weather. Regardless water is the most essential ingredient for every farm production. It may not be exactly what and when requested but rain has always come sometime or another.

Reminded of Deuteronomy 11:14: “He’ll take charge of sending the rain at the right time. So there’s plenty of grass for your animals and you’ll be able to harvest your crops.”

+++ALLELUIA+++

XV–11–3-14-2021